Speaker-Invariant Training via Adversarial Learning

04/02/2018 ∙ by Zhong Meng, et al. ∙ 0

We propose a novel adversarial multi-task learning scheme, aiming at actively curtailing the inter-talker feature variability while maximizing its senone discriminability so as to enhance the performance of a deep neural network (DNN) based ASR system. We call the scheme speaker-invariant training (SIT). In SIT, a DNN acoustic model and a speaker classifier network are jointly optimized to minimize the senone (tied triphone state) classification loss, and simultaneously mini-maximize the speaker classification loss. A speaker-invariant and senone-discriminative deep feature is learned through this adversarial multi-task learning. With SIT, a canonical DNN acoustic model with significantly reduced variance in its output probabilities is learned with no explicit speaker-independent (SI) transformations or speaker-specific representations used in training or testing. Evaluated on the CHiME-3 dataset, the SIT achieves 4.99 conventional SI acoustic model. With additional unsupervised speaker adaptation, the speaker-adapted (SA) SIT model achieves 4.86 over the SA SI acoustic model.

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1 Introduction

The deep neural network (DNN) based acoustic models have been widely used in automatic speech recognition (ASR) and have achieved extraordinary performance improvement [1, 2]. However, the performance of a speaker-independent (SI) acoustic model trained with speech data from a large number of speakers is still affected by the spectral variations in each speech unit caused by the inter-speaker variability. Therefore, speaker adaptation methods are widely used to boost the recognition system performance [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13].

Recently, adversarial learning has captured great attention of deep learning community given its remarkable success in estimating generative models

[14]. In speech, it has been applied to noise-robust [15, 16, 17, 18, 19] and conversational ASR [20] using gradient reversal layer [21] or domain separation network [22]. Inspired by this, we propose speaker-invariant training (SIT) via adversarial learning to reduce the effect of speaker variability in acoustic modeling. In SIT, a DNN acoustic model and a DNN speaker classifier are jointly trained to simultaneously optimize the primary task of minimizing the senone classification loss and the secondary task of mini-maximizing the speaker classification loss. Through this adversarial multi-task learning procedure, a feature extractor is learned as the bottom layers of the DNN acoustic model that maps the input speech frames from different speakers into speaker-invariant and senone-discriminative deep hidden features, so that further senone classification is based on representations with the speaker factor already normalized out. The DNN acoustic model with SIT can be directly used to generate word transcription for unseen test speakers through one-pass online decoding. On top of the SIT DNN, further adaptation can be performed to adjust the model towards the test speakers, achieving even higher ASR accuracy.

We evaluate SIT with ASR experiments on CHiME-3 dataset, the SIT DNN acoustic model achieves 4.99% relative WER improvement over the baseline SI DNN. Further, SIT achieves 4.86% relative WER gain over the SI DNN when the same unsupervised speaker adaptation process is performed on both models. With t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE) [23] visualization, we show that, after SIT, the deep feature distributions of different speakers are well aligned with each other, which demonstrates the strong capability of SIT in reducing speaker-variability.

2 Related Work

Speaker-adaptive training (SAT) is proposed to generate canonical acoustic models coupled with speaker adaptation. For Gaussian mixture model (GMM)-hidden Markov model (HMM) acoustic model, SAT applies unconstrained

[24] or constrained [25]

model-space linear transformations that separately model the speaker-specific characteristics and are jointly estimated with the GMM-HMM parameters to maximize the likelihood of the training data. Cluster-adaptive training (CAT)

[26]

is then proposed to use a linear interpolation of all the cluster means as the mean of the particular speaker instead of a single cluster as representative of a particular speaker. However, SAT of GMM-HMM needs to have two sets of models, the SI model and canonical model. During testing, the SI model is used to generate the first pass decoding transcription, and the canonical model is combined with speaker-specific transformation to adapt to the new speaker.

For DNN-HMM acoustic model, CAT [12] and multi-basis adaptive neural networks [7] are proposed to represent the weight and/or the bias of the speaker-dependent (SD) affine transformation in each hidden layer of a DNN acoustic model as a linear combination of SI bases, where the combination weights are low-dimensional SD speaker representations. The canonical SI bases with reduced variances are jointly optimized with the SD speaker representations during the SAT to minimize the cross-entropy loss. During unsupervised adaptation, the test speaker representations are re-estimated using alignments from the first-pass decoding of the test data with SI DNN as the supervisions and are used in the second-pass decoding to generate the transcription. Factorized hidden layer [13] is similar to [12, 7], but includes SI DNN weights as part of the linear combination. In [5], SD speaker codes are transformed by a set of SI matrices and then directly added to the biases of the hidden-layer affine transformations. The speaker codes and SI transformations are jointly estimated during SAT. For these methods, two passes of decoding are required to generate the final transcription in unsupervised adaption setup, which increases the computational complexity of the system.

In [6, 3]

, an SI adaptation network is learned to derive speaker-normalized features from i-vectors to train the canonical DNN acoustic model. The i-vectors for the test speakers are then estimated and used for decoding after going through the SI adaptation network. In

[20], a reconstruction network is trained to predict the input i-vector given the speech feature and its corresponding i-vector are at the input of the acoustic model. The mean-squared error loss of the i-vector reconstruction and the cross-entropy loss of the DNN acoustic model are jointly optimized through adversarial multi-task learning. Although these methods generate the final transcription with one-pass of decoding, they need to go through the entire test utterances in order to estimate the i-vectors, making it impossible to perform online decoding. Moreover, the accuracy of i-vectors estimation are limited by the duration of the test utterances. The estimation of i-vector for each utterance also increases the computational complexity of the system.

SIT directly minimizes the speaker variations by optimizing an adversarial multi-task objective other than the most basic cross entropy object as in SAT. It forgoes the need of estimating any additional SI bases or speaker representations during training or testing. The direct use of SIT DNN acoustic model in testing enables the generation of word transcription for unseen test speakers through one-pass online decoding. Moreover, it effectively suppresses the inter-speaker variability via a lightweight system with much reduced training parameters and computational complexity. To achieve additional gain, unsupervised speaker adaptation can also be further conducted on the SIT model with one extra pass of decoding.

3 Speaker-Invariant Training

To perform SIT, we need a sequence of speech frames , a sequence of senone labels aligned with and a sequence of speaker labels aligned with . The goal of SIT is to reduce the variances of hidden and output units distributions of the DNN acoustic model that are caused by the inherent inter-speaker variability in the speech signal. To achieve speaker-robustness, we learn a speaker-invariant and senone-discriminative

deep hidden feature in the DNN acoustic model through adversarial multi-task learning and make senone posterior predictions based on the learned deep feature. In order to do so, we view the first few layers of the acoustic model as a feature extractor network

with parameters that maps from different speakers to deep hidden features (see Fig. 1) and the upper layers of the acoustic model as a senone classifier with parameters that maps the intermediate features to the senone posteriors as follows:

Figure 1: The framework of speaker-invariant training via adversarial learning for unsupervised adaptation of the acoustic models
(1)

where is the set of all senones modeled by the acoustic model.

We further introduce a speaker classifier network which maps the deep features to the speaker posteriors as follows:

(2)

where is one speaker in the set of all speakers .

To make the deep features speaker-invariant, the distributions of the features from different speakers should be as close to each other as possible. Therefore, the and are jointly trained with an adversarial objective, in which is adjusted to maximize the frame-level speaker classification loss while is adjusted to minimize below:

(3)

where denote the speaker label for the input frame .

This minimax competition will first increase the discriminativity of and the speaker-invariance of the features generated by , and will eventually converge to the point where generates extremely confusing features that is unable to distinguish.

At the same time, we want to make the deep features senone-discriminative by minimizing the cross-entropy loss between the predicted senone posteriors and the senone labels as follows:

(4)

In SIT, the acoustic model network and the condition classifier network are trained to jointly optimize the primary task of senone classification and the secondary task of speaker classification with an adversarial objective function. Therefore, the total loss is constructed as

(5)

where controls the trade-off between the senone loss and the speaker classification loss in Eq.(4) and Eq.(3) respectively.

We need to find the optimal parameters and such that

(6)
(7)

The parameters are updated as follows via back propagation with stochastic gradient descent (SGD):

(8)
(9)
(10)

where is the learning rate.

Note that the negative coefficient in Eq. (8) induces reversed gradient that maximizes in Eq. (3) and makes the deep feature speaker-invariant. For easy implementation, gradient reversal layer is introduced in [21], which acts as an identity transform in the forward propagation and multiplies the gradient by during the backward propagation.

The optimized network consisting of and is used as the SIT acoustic model for ASR on test data.

4 Experiments

In this work, we perform SIT on a DNN-hidden Markov model (HMM) acoustic model for ASR on CHiME-3 dataset.

4.1 CHiME-3 Dataset

The CHiME-3 dataset is released with the 3rd CHiME speech Separation and Recognition Challenge [27], which incorporates the Wall Street Journal corpus sentences spoken in challenging noisy environments, recorded using a 6-channel tablet based microphone array. CHiME-3 dataset consists of both real and simulated data. The real speech data was recorded in five real noisy environments (on buses (BUS), in cafés (CAF), in pedestrian areas (PED), at street junctions (STR) and in booth (BTH)). To generate the simulated data, the clean speech is first convolved with the estimated impulse response of the environment and then mixed with the background noise separately recorded in that environment [28]. The noisy training data consists of 1999 real noisy utterances from 4 speakers, and 7138 simulated noisy utterances from 83 speakers in the WSJ0 SI-84 training set recorded in 4 noisy environments. There are 3280 utterances in the development set including 410 real and 410 simulated utterances for each of the 4 environments. There are 2640 utterances in the test set including 330 real and 330 simulated utterances for each of the 4 environments. The speakers in training set, development set and the test set are mutually different (i.e., 12 different speakers in the CHiME-3 dataset). The training, development and test data sets are all recorded in 6 different channels.

In the experiments, we use 9137 noisy training utterances in the CHiME-3 dataset as the training data. The real and simulated development data in CHiME-3 are used as the test data. Both the training and test data are far-field speech from the 5th microphone channel. The WSJ 5K word 3-gram language model (LM) is used for decoding.

4.2 Baseline System

In the baseline system, we first train an SI DNN-HMM acoustic model using 9137 noisy training utterances with cross-entropy criterion.

The 29-dimensional log Mel filterbank features together with 1st and 2nd order delta features (totally 87-dimensional) for both the clean and noisy utterances are extracted by following the process in [29]. Each frame is spliced together with 5 left and 5 right context frames to form a 957-dimensional feature. The spliced features are fed as the input of the feed-forward DNN after global mean and variance normalization. The DNN has 7 hidden layers with 2048 hidden units for each layer. The output layer of the DNN has 3012 output units corresponding to 3012 senone labels. Senone-level forced alignment of the clean data is generated using a Gaussian mixture model-HMM system. As shown in Table 1

, the WERs for the SI DNN are 17.84% and 17.72% respectively on real and simulated test data respectively. Note that our experimental setup does not achieve the state-of-the-art performance on CHiME-3 dataset (e.g., we did not perform beamforming, sequence training or use recurrent neural network language model for decoding.) since our goal is to simply verify the effectiveness of SIT in reducing inter-speaker variability.

4.3 Speaker-Invariant Training for Robust Speech Recognition

We further perform SIT on the baseline noisy DNN acoustic model with 9137 noisy training utterances in CHiME-3. The feature extractor is initialized with the first layers of the DNN and the senone classifier is initialized with the rest hidden layers plus the output layer. indicates the position of the deep hidden feature in the acoustic model. The speaker classifier is a feedforward DNN with 2 hidden layers and 512 hidden units for each layer. The output layer of has 87 units predicting the posteriors of 87 speakers in the training set. , and are jointly trained with an adversarial multi-task objective as described in Section 3. and are fixed at and in our experiments. The SIT DNN acoustic model achieves 16.95% and 16.54% WER on the real and simulated test data respectively, which are 4.99% and 6.66% relative improvements over the SI DNN baseline.

System Data BUS CAF PED STR Avg.
SI
Real 24.77 16.12 13.39 17.27 17.84
Simu 18.07 21.44 14.68 16.70 17.72
SIT
Real 22.91 15.63 12.77 16.66 16.95
Simu 16.64 20.23 13.53 15.96 16.54
Table 1: The ASR WER (%) performance of SI and SIT DNN acoustic models on real and simulated development set of CHiME-3.

4.4 Visualization of Deep Features

We randomly select two male speakers and two female speakers from the noisy training set and extract speech frames aligned with the phoneme “ah” for each of the four speakers. In Figs. 2 and 3, we visualize the deep features generated by the SI and SIT DNN acoustic models when the “ah” frames of the four speakers are given as the input using t-SNE. In Fig. 2, the deep feature distributions in the SI model for the male (in red and green) and female speakers (in back and blue) are far away from each other and even the distributions for the speakers of the same gender are separated from each other. While after SIT, the deep feature distributions for all the male and female speakers are well aligned with each other as shown in Fig. 3. The significant increase in the overlap among distributions of different speakers justifies that the SIT remarkably enhances the speaker-invariance of the deep features . The adversarial optimization of the speaker classification loss does not just serve as a regularization term to achieve better generalization on the test data.

Figure 2: t-SNE visualization of the deep features generated by the SI DNN acoustic model when speech frames aligned with phoneme “ah” from two male and two female speakers in CHiME-3 training set are fed as the input.
Figure 3: t-SNE visualization of the deep features generated by the SIT DNN acoustic model when the same speech frames as in Fig. 2 are fed as the input.

4.5 Unsupervised Speaker Adaptation

SIT aims at suppressing the effect of inter-speaker variability on DNN acoustic model so that the acoustic model is more compact and has stronger discriminative power. When adapted to the same test speakers, the SIT DNN is expected to achieve higher ASR performance than the baseline SI DNN due to the smaller overlaps among the distributions of different speech units.

In our experiment, we adapt the SI and SIT DNNs to each of the 4 speakers in the test set in an unsupervised fashion. The constrained re-training (CRT) [30] method is used for adaptation, where we re-estimate the DNN parameters of only a subset of layers while holding the remaining parameters fixed during cross-entropy training. The adaptation target (1-best alignment) is obtained through the first-pass decoding of the test data, and the second-pass decoding is performed using the SA SI and SI DNNs.

The WER results for unsupervised speaker adaptation is shown in Table 2, in which only the bottom 2 layers of the SI and SIT DNNs are adapted during CRT. The speaker-adapted (SA) SIT DNN achieves 15.46% WER which is 4.86% relatively higher than the SA SI DNN. The CRT adaptation provides 8.91% and 8.79% relative WER gains over the unadapted SI and SIT models respectively. The lower WER after speaker adaptation indicates that SIT has effectively reduced the high variance and overlap in an SI acoustic model caused by the inter-speaker variability.

System BUS CAF PED STR Avg.
SA SI
22.76 15.56 11.52 15.37 16.25
SA SIT
21.42 14.79 11.11 14.70 15.46
Table 2: The ASR WER (%) performance of SA SI and SA SIT DNN acoustic models after CRT unsupervised speaker adaptation on real development set of CHiME-3.

5 Conclusions and Future Works

In this work, SIT is proposed to suppress the effect of inter-speaker variability on the SI DNN acoustic model. In SIT, a DNN acoustic model and a speaker classifier network are jointly optimized to minimize the senone classification loss, and simultaneously mini-maximize the speaker classification loss. Through this adversarial multi-task learning procedure, a feature extractor network is learned to map the input frames from different speakers to deep hidden features that are both speaker-invariant and senone-discriminative.

Evaluated on CHiME-3 dataset, the SIT DNN acoustic model achieves 4.99% relative WER improvement over the baseline SI DNN. With the unsupervised adaptation towards the test speakers using CRT, the SA SIT DNN achieves additional 8.79% relative WER gain, which is 4.86% relatively improved over the SA SI DNN. With t-SNE visualization, we show that, after SIT, the deep feature distributions of different speakers are well aligned with each other, which verifies the strong capability of SIT in reducing speaker-variability.

SIT forgoes the need of estimating any additional SI bases or speaker representations which are necessary in other conventional approaches such as SAT. The SIT trained DNN acoustic model can be directly used to generate the transcription for unseen test speakers through one-pass online decoding. It enables a lightweight speaker-invariant ASR system with reduced number of parameters for both training and testing. Additional gains are achievable by performing further unsupervised speaker adaptation on top of the SIT model.

In the future, we will evaluate the performance of the i-vector based speaker-adversarial multi-task learning [20] on CHiME-3 dataset and compare it with the proposed SIT. Moreover, we will perform SIT on thousands of hours of data to verify the its scalability to large dataset.

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