Software Model-Checking as Cyclic-Proof Search

11/10/2021
by   Takeshi Tsukada, et al.
0

This paper shows that a variety of software model-checking algorithms can be seen as proof-search strategies for a non-standard proof system, known as a cyclic proof system. Our use of the cyclic proof system as a logical foundation of software model checking enables us to compare different algorithms, to reconstruct well-known algorithms from a few simple principles, and to obtain soundness proofs of algorithms for free. Among others, we show the significance of a heuristics based on a notion that we call maximal conservativity; this explains the cores of important algorithms such as property-directed reachability (PDR) and reveals a surprising connection to an efficient solver of games over infinite graphs that was not regarded as a kind of PDR.

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