Prediction of neonatal mortality in Sub-Saharan African countries using data-level linkage of multiple surveys

11/25/2020
by   Girmaw Abebe Tadesse, et al.
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Existing datasets available to address crucial problems, such as child mortality and family planning discontinuation in developing countries, are not ample for data-driven approaches. This is partly due to disjoint data collection efforts employed across locations, times, and variations of modalities. On the other hand, state-of-the-art methods for small data problem are confined to image modalities. In this work, we proposed a data-level linkage of disjoint surveys across Sub-Saharan African countries to improve prediction performance of neonatal death and provide cross-domain explainability.

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