Nonlinear Dynamic Field Embedding: On Hyperspectral Scene Visualization

11/28/2012 ∙ by Dalton Lunga 'and' Okan Ersoy, et al. ∙ 0

Graph embedding techniques are useful to characterize spectral signature relations for hyperspectral images. However, such images consists of disjoint classes due to spatial details that are often ignored by existing graph computing tools. Robust parameter estimation is a challenge for kernel functions that compute such graphs. Finding a corresponding high quality coordinate system to map signature relations remains an open research question. We answer positively on these challenges by first proposing a kernel function of spatial and spectral information in computing neighborhood graphs. Secondly, the study exploits the force field interpretation from mechanics and devise a unifying nonlinear graph embedding framework. The generalized framework leads to novel unsupervised multidimensional artificial field embedding techniques that rely on the simple additive assumption of pair-dependent attraction and repulsion functions. The formulations capture long range and short range distance related effects often associated with living organisms and help to establish algorithmic properties that mimic mutual behavior for the purpose of dimensionality reduction. The main benefits from the proposed models includes the ability to preserve the local topology of data and produce quality visualizations i.e. maintaining disjoint meaningful neighborhoods. As part of evaluation, visualization, gradient field trajectories, and semisupervised classification experiments are conducted for image scenes acquired by multiple sensors at various spatial resolutions over different types of objects. The results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed embedding framework over various widely used methods.

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