Neglecting discretization corrections in regularized singular or nearly singular integrals

04/14/2020
by   J. Thomas Beale, et al.
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A method for computing singular or nearly singular integrals on closed surfaces was presented by J. T. Beale, W. Ying, and J. R. Wilson [Comm. Comput. Phys. 20 (2016), 733–753, arxiv.org/abs/1508.00265] and applied to single and double layer potentials for harmonic functions. It uses regularized kernels, a straightforward quadrature rule, and corrections added for smoothing and discretization errors. In this note we give estimates for the discretization corrections which show that they can reasonably be neglected with proper choice of numerical parameters.

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