Navigating A Mobile Robot Using Switching Distributed Sensor Networks

06/25/2021 ∙ by Xingkang He, et al. ∙ 0

This paper proposes a method to navigate a mobile robot by estimating its state over a number of distributed sensor networks (DSNs) such that it can successively accomplish a sequence of tasks, i.e., its state enters each targeted set and stays inside no less than the desired time, under a resource-aware, time-efficient, and computation- and communication-constrained setting.We propose a new robot state estimation and navigation architecture, which integrates an event-triggered task-switching feedback controller for the robot and a two-time-scale distributed state estimator for each sensor. The architecture has three major advantages over existing approaches: First, in each task only one DSN is active for sensing and estimating the robot state, and for different tasks the robot can switch the active DSN by taking resource saving and system performance into account; Second, the robot only needs to communicate with one active sensor at each time to obtain its state information from the active DSN; Third, no online optimization is required. With the controller, the robot is able to accomplish a task by following a reference trajectory and switch to the next task when an event-triggered condition is fulfilled. With the estimator, each active sensor is able to estimate the robot state. Under proper conditions, we prove that the state estimation error and the trajectory tracking deviation are upper bounded by two time-varying sequences respectively, which play an essential role in the event-triggered condition. Furthermore, we find a sufficient condition for accomplishing a task and provide an upper bound of running time for the task. Numerical simulations of an indoor robot's localization and navigation are provided to validate the proposed architecture.

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