Harmonic Functions for Data Reconstruction on 3D Manifolds

02/01/2011 ∙ by Li Chen, et al. ∙ 0

In computer graphics, smooth data reconstruction on 2D or 3D manifolds usually refers to subdivision problems. Such a method is only valid based on dense sample points. The manifold usually needs to be triangulated into meshes (or patches) and each node on the mesh will have an initial value. While the mesh is refined the algorithm will provide a smooth function on the redefined manifolds. However, when data points are not dense and the original mesh is not allowed to be changed, how is the "continuous and/or smooth" reconstruction possible? This paper will present a new method using harmonic functions to solve the problem. Our method contains the following steps: (1) Partition the boundary surfaces of the 3D manifold based on sample points so that each sample point is on the edge of the partition. (2) Use gradually varied interpolation on the edges so that each point on edge will be assigned a value. In addition, all values on the edge are gradually varied. (3) Use discrete harmonic function to fit the unknown points, i.e. the points inside each partition patch. The fitted function will be a harmonic or a local harmonic function in each partitioned area. The function on edge will be "near" continuous (or "near" gradually varied). If we need a smoothed surface on the manifold, we can apply subdivision algorithms. This paper has also a philosophical advantage over triangulation meshes. People usually use triangulation for data reconstruction. This paper employs harmonic functions, a generalization of triangulation because linearity is a form of harmonic. Therefore, local harmonic initialization is more sophisticated then triangulation. This paper is a conceptual and methodological paper. This paper does not focus on detailed mathematical analysis nor fine algorithm design.

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