Decentralized Deep Reinforcement Learning for Network Level Traffic Signal Control

07/02/2020 ∙ by Jin Guo, et al. ∙ 0

In this thesis, I propose a family of fully decentralized deep multi-agent reinforcement learning (MARL) algorithms to achieve high, real-time performance in network-level traffic signal control. In this approach, each intersection is modeled as an agent that plays a Markovian Game against the other intersection nodes in a traffic signal network modeled as an undirected graph, to approach the optimal reduction in delay. Following Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDPs), there are 3 levels of communication schemes between adjacent learning agents: independent deep Q-leaning (IDQL), shared states reinforcement learning (S2RL) and a shared states rewards version of S2RL–S2R2L. In these 3 variants of decentralized MARL schemes, individual agent trains its local deep Q network (DQN) separately, enhanced by convergence-guaranteed techniques like double DQN, prioritized experience replay, multi-step bootstrapping, etc. To test the performance of the proposed three MARL algorithms, a SUMO-based simulation platform is developed to mimic the traffic evolution of the real world. Fed with random traffic demand between permitted OD pairs, a 4x4 Manhattan-style grid network is set up as the testbed, two different vehicle arrival rates are generated for model training and testing. The experiment results show that S2R2L has a quicker convergence rate and better convergent performance than IDQL and S2RL in the training process. Moreover, three MARL schemes all reveal exceptional generalization abilities. Their testing results surpass the benchmark Max Pressure (MP) algorithm, under the criteria of average vehicle delay, network-level queue length and fuel consumption rate. Notably, S2R2L has the best testing performance of reducing 34.55 length compared with MP.

READ FULL TEXT
POST COMMENT

Comments

There are no comments yet.

Authors

page 16

This week in AI

Get the week's most popular data science and artificial intelligence research sent straight to your inbox every Saturday.