Data Augmentation of Railway Images for Track Inspection

02/05/2018 ∙ by S. Ritika, et al. ∙ 0

Regular maintenance of all the assets is pivotal for proper functioning of railway. Manual maintenance can be very cumbersome and leave room for errors. Track anomalies like vegetation overgrowth, sun kinks affect the track construct and result in unequal load transfer, imbalanced lateral forces on tracks which causes further deterioration of tracks and can ultimately result in derailment of locomotive. Hence there is a need to continuously monitor rail track health. Track anomalies are rare with the skew as high as one anomaly in millions of good images. We propose a method to build training data that will make our algorithms more robust and help us detect real world track issues. The data augmentation will have a direct effect in making us detect better anomalies and hence improve time for railroads that is spent in manual inspection. This paper talks about a real world use case of detecting railway track defects from a camera mounted on a moving locomotive and tracking their locations. The camera is engineered to withstand the environment factors on a moving train and provide a consistent steady image at around 30 frames per second. An image simulation pipeline of track detection, region of interest selection, augmenting image for anomalies is implemented. Training images are simulated for sun kink and vegetation overgrowth. Inception V3 model pretrained on Imagenet dataset is finetuned for a 2 class classification. For the case of vegetation overgrowth, the model generalizes well on actual vegetation images, though it was trained and validated solely on simulated images which might have different distribution than the actual vegetation. Sun kink classifier can classify professionally simulated sun kink videos with a precision of 97.5

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