Click-Through Rate Prediction Using Graph Neural Networks and Online Learning

05/09/2021 ∙ by Farzaneh Rajabi, et al. ∙ 0

Recommendation systems have been extensively studied by many literature in the past and are ubiquitous in online advertisement, shopping industry/e-commerce, query suggestions in search engines, and friend recommendation in social networks. Moreover, restaurant/music/product/movie/news/app recommendations are only a few of the applications of a recommender system. A small percent improvement on the CTR prediction accuracy has been mentioned to add millions of dollars of revenue to the advertisement industry. Click-Through-Rate (CTR) prediction is a special version of recommender system in which the goal is predicting whether or not a user is going to click on a recommended item. A content-based recommendation approach takes into account the past history of the user's behavior, i.e. the recommended products and the users reaction to them. So, a personalized model that recommends the right item to the right user at the right time is the key to building such a model. On the other hand, the so-called collaborative filtering approach incorporates the click history of the users who are very similar to a particular user, thereby helping the recommender to come up with a more confident prediction for that particular user by leveraging the wider knowledge of users who share their taste in a connected network of users. In this project, we are interested in building a CTR predictor using Graph Neural Networks complemented by an online learning algorithm that models such dynamic interactions. By framing the problem as a binary classification task, we have evaluated this system both on the offline models (GNN, Deep Factorization Machines) with test-AUC of 0.7417 and on the online learning model with test-AUC of 0.7585 using a sub-sampled version of Criteo public dataset consisting of 10,000 data points.

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