A Cooperative Freeway Merge Assistance System using Connected Vehicles

04/29/2018 ∙ by Md Salman Ahmed, et al. ∙ 0

The rapid growth of traffic-related fatalities and injuries around the world including developed countries has drawn researchers' attention for conducting research on automated highway systems to improve road safety over the past few years. In addition, fuel expenses due to traffic congestion in the U.S. translate to billions of dollars annually. These issues are motivating researchers across many disciplines to develop strategies to implement automation in transportation. The advent of connected-vehicle (CV) technology has added a new dimension to the research. The CV technology allows a vehicle to communicate with roadside infrastructure (vehicle-to-infrastructure), and other vehicles (vehicle-to-vehicle) on roads wirelessly using dedicated short-range communication (DSRC) protocol. Collectively, the vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication technologies are known as V2X technology. Automotive companies have started to include On-Board Units (OBUs) on latest automobiles which can run safety-critical and assistive applications using V2X technology. For example, US Department of Transportation has already launched various applications including but not limited to lane-change assistance, collision avoidance, SPaT for emergency and transit vehicles. Merge conflicts, especially when vehicles are trying to merge from ramps to freeways, are a significant source of collisions, traffic congestion and fuel use. This paper describes a novel freeway merge assistance system utilizing V2X technology with the help of the DSRC protocol. The freeway merge assistance system uses an innovative three-way handshaking protocol and provides advisories to drivers to guide the merging sequence.

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