Ming-Hsuan Yang

is this you? claim profile

0

Professor at University of California, Merced; Visiting researcher at Google Cloud

  • Inserting Videos into Videos

    In this paper, we introduce a new problem of manipulating a given video by inserting other videos into it. Our main task is, given an object video and a scene video, to insert the object video at a user-specified location in the scene video so that the resulting video looks realistic. We aim to handle different object motions and complex backgrounds without expensive segmentation annotations. As it is difficult to collect training pairs for this problem, we synthesize fake training pairs that can provide helpful supervisory signals when training a neural network with unpaired real data. The proposed network architecture can take both real and fake pairs as input and perform both supervised and unsupervised training in an adversarial learning scheme. To synthesize a realistic video, the network renders each frame based on the current input and previous frames. Within this framework, we observe that injecting noise into previous frames while generating the current frame stabilizes training. We conduct experiments on real-world videos in object tracking and person re-identification benchmark datasets. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is able to synthesize long sequences of realistic videos with a given object video inserted.

    03/15/2019 ∙ by Donghoon Lee, et al. ∙ 24 share

    read it

  • SCOPS: Self-Supervised Co-Part Segmentation

    Parts provide a good intermediate representation of objects that is robust with respect to the camera, pose and appearance variations. Existing works on part segmentation is dominated by supervised approaches that rely on large amounts of manual annotations and can not generalize to unseen object categories. We propose a self-supervised deep learning approach for part segmentation, where we devise several loss functions that aids in predicting part segments that are geometrically concentrated, robust to object variations and are also semantically consistent across different object instances. Extensive experiments on different types of image collections demonstrate that our approach can produce part segments that adhere to object boundaries and also more semantically consistent across object instances compared to existing self-supervised techniques.

    05/03/2019 ∙ by Wei-Chih Hung, et al. ∙ 18 share

    read it

  • Putting Humans in a Scene: Learning Affordance in 3D Indoor Environments

    Affordance modeling plays an important role in visual understanding. In this paper, we aim to predict affordances of 3D indoor scenes, specifically what human poses are afforded by a given indoor environment, such as sitting on a chair or standing on the floor. In order to predict valid affordances and learn possible 3D human poses in indoor scenes, we need to understand the semantic and geometric structure of a scene as well as its potential interactions with a human. To learn such a model, a large-scale dataset of 3D indoor affordances is required. In this work, we build a fully automatic 3D pose synthesizer that fuses semantic knowledge from a large number of 2D poses extracted from TV shows as well as 3D geometric knowledge from voxel representations of indoor scenes. With the data created by the synthesizer, we introduce a 3D pose generative model to predict semantically plausible and physically feasible human poses within a given scene (provided as a single RGB, RGB-D, or depth image). We demonstrate that our human affordance prediction method consistently outperforms existing state-of-the-art methods.

    03/13/2019 ∙ by Xueting Li, et al. ∙ 12 share

    read it

  • Mode Seeking Generative Adversarial Networks for Diverse Image Synthesis

    Most conditional generation tasks expect diverse outputs given a single conditional context. However, conditional generative adversarial networks (cGANs) often focus on the prior conditional information and ignore the input noise vectors, which contribute to the output variations. Recent attempts to resolve the mode collapse issue for cGANs are usually task-specific and computationally expensive. In this work, we propose a simple yet effective regularization term to address the mode collapse issue for cGANs. The proposed method explicitly maximizes the ratio of the distance between generated images with respect to the corresponding latent codes, thus encouraging the generators to explore more minor modes during training. This mode seeking regularization term is readily applicable to various conditional generation tasks without imposing training overhead or modifying the original network structures. We validate the proposed algorithm on three conditional image synthesis tasks including categorical generation, image-to-image translation, and text-to-image synthesis with different baseline models. Both qualitative and quantitative results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed regularization method for improving diversity without loss of quality.

    03/13/2019 ∙ by Qi Mao, et al. ∙ 12 share

    read it

  • Learning Linear Transformations for Fast Arbitrary Style Transfer

    Given a random pair of images, an arbitrary style transfer method extracts the feel from the reference image to synthesize an output based on the look of the other content image. Recent arbitrary style transfer methods transfer second order statistics from reference image onto content image via a multiplication between content image features and a transformation matrix, which is computed from features with a pre-determined algorithm. These algorithms either require computationally expensive operations, or fail to model the feature covariance and produce artifacts in synthesized images. Generalized from these methods, in this work, we derive the form of transformation matrix theoretically and present an arbitrary style transfer approach that learns the transformation matrix with a feed-forward network. Our algorithm is highly efficient yet allows a flexible combination of multi-level styles while preserving content affinity during style transfer process. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on four tasks: artistic style transfer, video and photo-realistic style transfer as well as domain adaptation, including comparisons with the state-of-the-art methods.

    08/14/2018 ∙ by Xueting Li, et al. ∙ 10 share

    read it

  • Depth-Aware Video Frame Interpolation

    Video frame interpolation aims to synthesize nonexistent frames in-between the original frames. While significant advances have been made from the recent deep convolutional neural networks, the quality of interpolation is often reduced due to large object motion or occlusion. In this work, we propose a video frame interpolation method which explicitly detects the occlusion by exploring the depth information. Specifically, we develop a depth-aware flow projection layer to synthesize intermediate flows that preferably sample closer objects than farther ones. In addition, we learn hierarchical features to gather contextual information from neighboring pixels. The proposed model then warps the input frames, depth maps, and contextual features based on the optical flow and local interpolation kernels for synthesizing the output frame. Our model is compact, efficient, and fully differentiable. Quantitative and qualitative results demonstrate that the proposed model performs favorably against state-of-the-art frame interpolation methods on a wide variety of datasets.

    04/01/2019 ∙ by Wenbo Bao, et al. ∙ 10 share

    read it

  • Im2Pencil: Controllable Pencil Illustration from Photographs

    We propose a high-quality photo-to-pencil translation method with fine-grained control over the drawing style. This is a challenging task due to multiple stroke types (e.g., outline and shading), structural complexity of pencil shading (e.g., hatching), and the lack of aligned training data pairs. To address these challenges, we develop a two-branch model that learns separate filters for generating sketchy outlines and tonal shading from a collection of pencil drawings. We create training data pairs by extracting clean outlines and tonal illustrations from original pencil drawings using image filtering techniques, and we manually label the drawing styles. In addition, our model creates different pencil styles (e.g., line sketchiness and shading style) in a user-controllable manner. Experimental results on different types of pencil drawings show that the proposed algorithm performs favorably against existing methods in terms of quality, diversity and user evaluations.

    03/20/2019 ∙ by Yijun Li, et al. ∙ 8 share

    read it

  • DRIT++: Diverse Image-to-Image Translation via Disentangled Representations

    Image-to-image translation aims to learn the mapping between two visual domains. There are two main challenges for this task: 1) lack of aligned training pairs and 2) multiple possible outputs from a single input image. In this work, we present an approach based on disentangled representation for generating diverse outputs without paired training images. To synthesize diverse outputs, we propose to embed images onto two spaces: a domain-invariant content space capturing shared information across domains and a domain-specific attribute space. Our model takes the encoded content features extracted from a given input and attribute vectors sampled from the attribute space to synthesize diverse outputs at test time. To handle unpaired training data, we introduce a cross-cycle consistency loss based on disentangled representations. Qualitative results show that our model can generate diverse and realistic images on a wide range of tasks without paired training data. For quantitative evaluations, we measure realism with user study and Fréchet inception distance, and measure diversity with the perceptual distance metric, Jensen-Shannon divergence, and number of statistically-different bins.

    05/02/2019 ∙ by Hsin-Ying Lee, et al. ∙ 8 share

    read it

  • Learning Dual Convolutional Neural Networks for Low-Level Vision

    In this paper, we propose a general dual convolutional neural network (DualCNN) for low-level vision problems, e.g., super-resolution, edge-preserving filtering, deraining and dehazing. These problems usually involve the estimation of two components of the target signals: structures and details. Motivated by this, our proposed DualCNN consists of two parallel branches, which respectively recovers the structures and details in an end-to-end manner. The recovered structures and details can generate the target signals according to the formation model for each particular application. The DualCNN is a flexible framework for low-level vision tasks and can be easily incorporated into existing CNNs. Experimental results show that the DualCNN can be effectively applied to numerous low-level vision tasks with favorable performance against the state-of-the-art methods.

    05/14/2018 ∙ by Jinshan Pan, et al. ∙ 6 share

    read it

  • Superpixel Sampling Networks

    Superpixels provide an efficient low/mid-level representation of image data, which greatly reduces the number of image primitives for subsequent vision tasks. Existing superpixel algorithms are not differentiable, making them difficult to integrate into otherwise end-to-end trainable deep neural networks. We develop a new differentiable model for superpixel sampling that leverages deep networks for learning superpixel segmentation. The resulting "Superpixel Sampling Network" (SSN) is end-to-end trainable, which allows learning task-specific superpixels with flexible loss functions and has fast runtime. Extensive experimental analysis indicates that SSNs not only outperform existing superpixel algorithms on traditional segmentation benchmarks, but can also learn superpixels for other tasks. In addition, SSNs can be easily integrated into downstream deep networks resulting in performance improvements.

    07/26/2018 ∙ by Varun Jampani, et al. ∙ 6 share

    read it

  • Physics-Based Generative Adversarial Models for Image Restoration and Beyond

    We present an algorithm to directly solve numerous image restoration problems (e.g., image deblurring, image dehazing, image deraining, etc.). These problems are highly ill-posed, and the common assumptions for existing methods are usually based on heuristic image priors. In this paper, we find that these problems can be solved by generative models with adversarial learning. However, the basic formulation of generative adversarial networks (GANs) does not generate realistic images, and some structures of the estimated images are usually not preserved well. Motivated by an interesting observation that the estimated results should be consistent with the observed inputs under the physics models, we propose a physics model constrained learning algorithm so that it can guide the estimation of the specific task in the conventional GAN framework. The proposed algorithm is trained in an end-to-end fashion and can be applied to a variety of image restoration and related low-level vision problems. Extensive experiments demonstrate that our method performs favorably against the state-of-the-art algorithms.

    08/02/2018 ∙ by Jinshan Pan, et al. ∙ 6 share

    read it