Yuwen Xiong

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  • UPSNet: A Unified Panoptic Segmentation Network

    In this paper, we propose a unified panoptic segmentation network (UPSNet) for tackling the newly proposed panoptic segmentation task. On top of a single backbone residual network, we first design a deformable convolution based semantic segmentation head and a Mask R-CNN style instance segmentation head which solve these two subtasks simultaneously. More importantly, we introduce a parameter-free panoptic head which solves the panoptic segmentation via pixel-wise classification. It first leverages the logits from the previous two heads and then innovatively expands the representation for enabling prediction of an extra unknown class which helps better resolve the conflicts between semantic and instance segmentation. Additionally, it handles the challenge caused by the varying number of instances and permits back propagation to the bottom modules in an end-to-end manner. Extensive experimental results on Cityscapes, COCO and our internal dataset demonstrate that our UPSNet achieves state-of-the-art performance with much faster inference.

    01/12/2019 ∙ by Yuwen Xiong, et al. ∙ 22 share

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  • Deep Rigid Instance Scene Flow

    In this paper we tackle the problem of scene flow estimation in the context of self-driving. We leverage deep learning techniques as well as strong priors as in our application domain the motion of the scene can be composed by the motion of the robot and the 3D motion of the actors in the scene. We formulate the problem as energy minimization in a deep structured model, which can be solved efficiently in the GPU by unrolling a Gaussian-Newton solver. Our experiments in the challenging KITTI scene flow dataset show that we outperform the state-of-the-art by a very large margin, while being 800 times faster.

    04/18/2019 ∙ by Wei-Chiu Ma, et al. ∙ 6 share

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  • Deformable Convolutional Networks

    Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are inherently limited to model geometric transformations due to the fixed geometric structures in its building modules. In this work, we introduce two new modules to enhance the transformation modeling capacity of CNNs, namely, deformable convolution and deformable RoI pooling. Both are based on the idea of augmenting the spatial sampling locations in the modules with additional offsets and learning the offsets from target tasks, without additional supervision. The new modules can readily replace their plain counterparts in existing CNNs and can be easily trained end-to-end by standard back-propagation, giving rise to deformable convolutional networks. Extensive experiments validate the effectiveness of our approach on sophisticated vision tasks of object detection and semantic segmentation. The code would be released.

    03/17/2017 ∙ by Jifeng Dai, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Deep Feature Flow for Video Recognition

    Deep convolutional neutral networks have achieved great success on image recognition tasks. Yet, it is non-trivial to transfer the state-of-the-art image recognition networks to videos as per-frame evaluation is too slow and unaffordable. We present deep feature flow, a fast and accurate framework for video recognition. It runs the expensive convolutional sub-network only on sparse key frames and propagates their deep feature maps to other frames via a flow field. It achieves significant speedup as flow computation is relatively fast. The end-to-end training of the whole architecture significantly boosts the recognition accuracy. Deep feature flow is flexible and general. It is validated on two recent large scale video datasets. It makes a large step towards practical video recognition.

    11/23/2016 ∙ by Xizhou Zhu, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Inference in Probabilistic Graphical Models by Graph Neural Networks

    A useful computation when acting in a complex environment is to infer the marginal probabilities or most probable states of task-relevant variables. Probabilistic graphical models can efficiently represent the structure of such complex data, but performing these inferences is generally difficult. Message-passing algorithms, such as belief propagation, are a natural way to disseminate evidence amongst correlated variables while exploiting the graph structure, but these algorithms can struggle when the conditional dependency graphs contain loops. Here we use Graph Neural Networks (GNNs) to learn a message-passing algorithm that solves these inference tasks. We first show that the architecture of GNNs is well-matched to inference tasks. We then demonstrate the efficacy of this inference approach by training GNNs on an ensemble of graphical models and showing that they substantially outperform belief propagation on loopy graphs. Our message-passing algorithms generalize out of the training set to larger graphs and graphs with different structure.

    03/21/2018 ∙ by KiJung Yoon, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Reviving and Improving Recurrent Back-Propagation

    In this paper, we revisit the recurrent back-propagation (RBP) algorithm, discuss the conditions under which it applies as well as how to satisfy them in deep neural networks. We show that RBP can be unstable and propose two variants based on conjugate gradient on the normal equations (CG-RBP) and Neumann series (Neumann-RBP). We further investigate the relationship between Neumann-RBP and back propagation through time (BPTT) and its truncated version (TBPTT). Our Neumann-RBP has the same time complexity as TBPTT but only requires constant memory, whereas TBPTT's memory cost scales linearly with the number of truncation steps. We examine all RBP variants along with BPTT and TBPTT in three different application domains: associative memory with continuous Hopfield networks, document classification in citation networks using graph neural networks and hyperparameter optimization for fully connected networks. All experiments demonstrate that RBPs, especially the Neumann-RBP variant, are efficient and effective for optimizing convergent recurrent neural networks.

    03/16/2018 ∙ by Renjie Liao, et al. ∙ 0 share

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