Tom Le Paine

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  • One-Shot High-Fidelity Imitation: Training Large-Scale Deep Nets with RL

    Humans are experts at high-fidelity imitation -- closely mimicking a demonstration, often in one attempt. Humans use this ability to quickly solve a task instance, and to bootstrap learning of new tasks. Achieving these abilities in autonomous agents is an open problem. In this paper, we introduce an off-policy RL algorithm (MetaMimic) to narrow this gap. MetaMimic can learn both (i) policies for high-fidelity one-shot imitation of diverse novel skills, and (ii) policies that enable the agent to solve tasks more efficiently than the demonstrators. MetaMimic relies on the principle of storing all experiences in a memory and replaying these to learn massive deep neural network policies by off-policy RL. This paper introduces, to the best of our knowledge, the largest existing neural networks for deep RL and shows that larger networks with normalization are needed to achieve one-shot high-fidelity imitation on a challenging manipulation task. The results also show that both types of policy can be learned from vision, in spite of the task rewards being sparse, and without access to demonstrator actions.

    10/11/2018 ∙ by Tom Le Paine, et al. ∙ 4 share

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  • Playing hard exploration games by watching YouTube

    Deep reinforcement learning methods traditionally struggle with tasks where environment rewards are particularly sparse. One successful method of guiding exploration in these domains is to imitate trajectories provided by a human demonstrator. However, these demonstrations are typically collected under artificial conditions, i.e. with access to the agent's exact environment setup and the demonstrator's action and reward trajectories. Here we propose a two-stage method that overcomes these limitations by relying on noisy, unaligned footage without access to such data. First, we learn to map unaligned videos from multiple sources to a common representation using self-supervised objectives constructed over both time and modality (i.e. vision and sound). Second, we embed a single YouTube video in this representation to construct a reward function that encourages an agent to imitate human gameplay. This method of one-shot imitation allows our agent to convincingly exceed human-level performance on the infamously hard exploration games Montezuma's Revenge, Pitfall! and Private Eye for the first time, even if the agent is not presented with any environment rewards.

    05/29/2018 ∙ by Yusuf Aytar, et al. ∙ 2 share

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  • Fast Generation for Convolutional Autoregressive Models

    Convolutional autoregressive models have recently demonstrated state-of-the-art performance on a number of generation tasks. While fast, parallel training methods have been crucial for their success, generation is typically implemented in a naïve fashion where redundant computations are unnecessarily repeated. This results in slow generation, making such models infeasible for production environments. In this work, we describe a method to speed up generation in convolutional autoregressive models. The key idea is to cache hidden states to avoid redundant computation. We apply our fast generation method to the Wavenet and PixelCNN++ models and achieve up to 21× and 183× speedups respectively.

    04/20/2017 ∙ by Prajit Ramachandran, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Seq-NMS for Video Object Detection

    Video object detection is challenging because objects that are easily detected in one frame may be difficult to detect in another frame within the same clip. Recently, there have been major advances for doing object detection in a single image. These methods typically contain three phases: (i) object proposal generation (ii) object classification and (iii) post-processing. We propose a modification of the post-processing phase that uses high-scoring object detections from nearby frames to boost scores of weaker detections within the same clip. We show that our method obtains superior results to state-of-the-art single image object detection techniques. Our method placed 3rd in the video object detection (VID) task of the ImageNet Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge 2015 (ILSVRC2015).

    02/26/2016 ∙ by Wei Han, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • How Deep Neural Networks Can Improve Emotion Recognition on Video Data

    We consider the task of dimensional emotion recognition on video data using deep learning. While several previous methods have shown the benefits of training temporal neural network models such as recurrent neural networks (RNNs) on hand-crafted features, few works have considered combining convolutional neural networks (CNNs) with RNNs. In this work, we present a system that performs emotion recognition on video data using both CNNs and RNNs, and we also analyze how much each neural network component contributes to the system's overall performance. We present our findings on videos from the Audio/Visual+Emotion Challenge (AV+EC2015). In our experiments, we analyze the effects of several hyperparameters on overall performance while also achieving superior performance to the baseline and other competing methods.

    02/24/2016 ∙ by Pooya Khorrami, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Do Deep Neural Networks Learn Facial Action Units When Doing Expression Recognition?

    Despite being the appearance-based classifier of choice in recent years, relatively few works have examined how much convolutional neural networks (CNNs) can improve performance on accepted expression recognition benchmarks and, more importantly, examine what it is they actually learn. In this work, not only do we show that CNNs can achieve strong performance, but we also introduce an approach to decipher which portions of the face influence the CNN's predictions. First, we train a zero-bias CNN on facial expression data and achieve, to our knowledge, state-of-the-art performance on two expression recognition benchmarks: the extended Cohn-Kanade (CK+) dataset and the Toronto Face Dataset (TFD). We then qualitatively analyze the network by visualizing the spatial patterns that maximally excite different neurons in the convolutional layers and show how they resemble Facial Action Units (FAUs). Finally, we use the FAU labels provided in the CK+ dataset to verify that the FAUs observed in our filter visualizations indeed align with the subject's facial movements.

    10/10/2015 ∙ by Pooya Khorrami, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • An Analysis of Unsupervised Pre-training in Light of Recent Advances

    Convolutional neural networks perform well on object recognition because of a number of recent advances: rectified linear units (ReLUs), data augmentation, dropout, and large labelled datasets. Unsupervised data has been proposed as another way to improve performance. Unfortunately, unsupervised pre-training is not used by state-of-the-art methods leading to the following question: Is unsupervised pre-training still useful given recent advances? If so, when? We answer this in three parts: we 1) develop an unsupervised method that incorporates ReLUs and recent unsupervised regularization techniques, 2) analyze the benefits of unsupervised pre-training compared to data augmentation and dropout on CIFAR-10 while varying the ratio of unsupervised to supervised samples, 3) verify our findings on STL-10. We discover unsupervised pre-training, as expected, helps when the ratio of unsupervised to supervised samples is high, and surprisingly, hurts when the ratio is low. We also use unsupervised pre-training with additional color augmentation to achieve near state-of-the-art performance on STL-10.

    12/20/2014 ∙ by Tom Le Paine, et al. ∙ 0 share

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