Remi Munos

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Senior Researcher at Google Deepmind

  • Statistics and Samples in Distributional Reinforcement Learning

    We present a unifying framework for designing and analysing distributional reinforcement learning (DRL) algorithms in terms of recursively estimating statistics of the return distribution. Our key insight is that DRL algorithms can be decomposed as the combination of some statistical estimator and a method for imputing a return distribution consistent with that set of statistics. With this new understanding, we are able to provide improved analyses of existing DRL algorithms as well as construct a new algorithm (EDRL) based upon estimation of the expectiles of the return distribution. We compare EDRL with existing methods on a variety of MDPs to illustrate concrete aspects of our analysis, and develop a deep RL variant of the algorithm, ER-DQN, which we evaluate on the Atari-57 suite of games.

    02/21/2019 ∙ by Mark Rowland, et al. ∙ 64 share

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  • Transfer in Deep Reinforcement Learning Using Successor Features and Generalised Policy Improvement

    The ability to transfer skills across tasks has the potential to scale up reinforcement learning (RL) agents to environments currently out of reach. Recently, a framework based on two ideas, successor features (SFs) and generalised policy improvement (GPI), has been introduced as a principled way of transferring skills. In this paper we extend the SFs & GPI framework in two ways. One of the basic assumptions underlying the original formulation of SFs & GPI is that rewards for all tasks of interest can be computed as linear combinations of a fixed set of features. We relax this constraint and show that the theoretical guarantees supporting the framework can be extended to any set of tasks that only differ in the reward function. Our second contribution is to show that one can use the reward functions themselves as features for future tasks, without any loss of expressiveness, thus removing the need to specify a set of features beforehand. This makes it possible to combine SFs & GPI with deep learning in a more stable way. We empirically verify this claim on a complex 3D environment where observations are images from a first-person perspective. We show that the transfer promoted by SFs & GPI leads to very good policies on unseen tasks almost instantaneously. We also describe how to learn policies specialised to the new tasks in a way that allows them to be added to the agent's set of skills, and thus be reused in the future.

    01/30/2019 ∙ by Andre Barreto, et al. ∙ 12 share

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  • Neural Replicator Dynamics

    In multiagent learning, agents interact in inherently nonstationary environments due to their concurrent policy updates. It is, therefore, paramount to develop and analyze algorithms that learn effectively despite these nonstationarities. A number of works have successfully conducted this analysis under the lens of evolutionary game theory (EGT), wherein a population of individuals interact and evolve based on biologically-inspired operators. These studies have mainly focused on establishing connections to value-iteration based approaches in stateless or tabular games. We extend this line of inquiry to formally establish links between EGT and policy gradient (PG) methods, which have been extensively applied in single and multiagent learning. We pinpoint weaknesses of the commonly-used softmax PG algorithm in adversarial and nonstationary settings and contrast PG's behavior to that predicted by replicator dynamics (RD), a central model in EGT. We consequently provide theoretical results that establish links between EGT and PG methods, then derive Neural Replicator Dynamics (NeuRD), a parameterized version of RD that constitutes a novel method with several advantages. First, as NeuRD reduces to the well-studied no-regret Hedge algorithm in the tabular setting, it inherits no-regret guarantees that enable convergence to equilibria in games. Second, NeuRD is shown to be more adaptive to nonstationarity, in comparison to PG, when learning in canonical games and imperfect information benchmarks including Poker. Thirdly, modifying any PG-based algorithm to use the NeuRD update rule is straightforward and incurs no added computational costs. Finally, while single-agent learning is not the main focus of the paper, we verify empirically that NeuRD is competitive in these settings with a recent baseline algorithm.

    06/01/2019 ∙ by Shayegan Omidshafiei, et al. ∙ 12 share

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  • The Termination Critic

    In this work, we consider the problem of autonomously discovering behavioral abstractions, or options, for reinforcement learning agents. We propose an algorithm that focuses on the termination condition, as opposed to -- as is common -- the policy. The termination condition is usually trained to optimize a control objective: an option ought to terminate if another has better value. We offer a different, information-theoretic perspective, and propose that terminations should focus instead on the compressibility of the option's encoding -- arguably a key reason for using abstractions. To achieve this algorithmically, we leverage the classical options framework, and learn the option transition model as a "critic" for the termination condition. Using this model, we derive gradients that optimize the desired criteria. We show that the resulting options are non-trivial, intuitively meaningful, and useful for learning and planning.

    02/26/2019 ∙ by Anna Harutyunyan, et al. ∙ 10 share

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  • Actor-Critic Policy Optimization in Partially Observable Multiagent Environments

    Optimization of parameterized policies for reinforcement learning (RL) is an important and challenging problem in artificial intelligence. Among the most common approaches are algorithms based on gradient ascent of a score function representing discounted return. In this paper, we examine the role of these policy gradient and actor-critic algorithms in partially-observable multiagent environments. We show several candidate policy update rules and relate them to a foundation of regret minimization and multiagent learning techniques for the one-shot and tabular cases, leading to previously unknown convergence guarantees. We apply our method to model-free multiagent reinforcement learning in adversarial sequential decision problems (zero-sum imperfect information games), using RL-style function approximation. We evaluate on commonly used benchmark Poker domains, showing performance against fixed policies and empirical convergence to approximate Nash equilibria in self-play with rates similar to or better than a baseline model-free algorithm for zero sum games, without any domain-specific state space reductions.

    10/21/2018 ∙ by Sriram Srinivasan, et al. ∙ 8 share

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  • Universal Successor Features Approximators

    The ability of a reinforcement learning (RL) agent to learn about many reward functions at the same time has many potential benefits, such as the decomposition of complex tasks into simpler ones, the exchange of information between tasks, and the reuse of skills. We focus on one aspect in particular, namely the ability to generalise to unseen tasks. Parametric generalisation relies on the interpolation power of a function approximator that is given the task description as input; one of its most common form are universal value function approximators (UVFAs). Another way to generalise to new tasks is to exploit structure in the RL problem itself. Generalised policy improvement (GPI) combines solutions of previous tasks into a policy for the unseen task; this relies on instantaneous policy evaluation of old policies under the new reward function, which is made possible through successor features (SFs). Our proposed universal successor features approximators (USFAs) combine the advantages of all of these, namely the scalability of UVFAs, the instant inference of SFs, and the strong generalisation of GPI. We discuss the challenges involved in training a USFA, its generalisation properties and demonstrate its practical benefits and transfer abilities on a large-scale domain in which the agent has to navigate in a first-person perspective three-dimensional environment.

    12/18/2018 ∙ by Diana Borsa, et al. ∙ 6 share

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  • Automated Curriculum Learning for Neural Networks

    We introduce a method for automatically selecting the path, or syllabus, that a neural network follows through a curriculum so as to maximise learning efficiency. A measure of the amount that the network learns from each data sample is provided as a reward signal to a nonstationary multi-armed bandit algorithm, which then determines a stochastic syllabus. We consider a range of signals derived from two distinct indicators of learning progress: rate of increase in prediction accuracy, and rate of increase in network complexity. Experimental results for LSTM networks on three curricula demonstrate that our approach can significantly accelerate learning, in some cases halving the time required to attain a satisfactory performance level.

    04/10/2017 ∙ by Alex Graves, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Distributional Reinforcement Learning with Quantile Regression

    In reinforcement learning an agent interacts with the environment by taking actions and observing the next state and reward. When sampled probabilistically, these state transitions, rewards, and actions can all induce randomness in the observed long-term return. Traditionally, reinforcement learning algorithms average over this randomness to estimate the value function. In this paper, we build on recent work advocating a distributional approach to reinforcement learning in which the distribution over returns is modeled explicitly instead of only estimating the mean. That is, we examine methods of learning the value distribution instead of the value function. We give results that close a number of gaps between the theoretical and algorithmic results given by Bellemare, Dabney, and Munos (2017). First, we extend existing results to the approximate distribution setting. Second, we present a novel distributional reinforcement learning algorithm consistent with our theoretical formulation. Finally, we evaluate this new algorithm on the Atari 2600 games, observing that it significantly outperforms many of the recent improvements on DQN, including the related distributional algorithm C51.

    10/27/2017 ∙ by Will Dabney, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • The Uncertainty Bellman Equation and Exploration

    We consider the exploration/exploitation problem in reinforcement learning. For exploitation, it is well known that the Bellman equation connects the value at any time-step to the expected value at subsequent time-steps. In this paper we consider a similar uncertainty Bellman equation (UBE), which connects the uncertainty at any time-step to the expected uncertainties at subsequent time-steps, thereby extending the potential exploratory benefit of a policy beyond individual time-steps. We prove that the unique fixed point of the UBE yields an upper bound on the variance of the estimated value of any fixed policy. This bound can be much tighter than traditional count-based bonuses that compound standard deviation rather than variance. Importantly, and unlike several existing approaches to optimism, this method scales naturally to large systems with complex generalization. Substituting our UBE-exploration strategy for ϵ-greedy improves DQN performance on 51 out of 57 games in the Atari suite.

    09/15/2017 ∙ by Brendan O'Donoghue, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Memory-Efficient Backpropagation Through Time

    We propose a novel approach to reduce memory consumption of the backpropagation through time (BPTT) algorithm when training recurrent neural networks (RNNs). Our approach uses dynamic programming to balance a trade-off between caching of intermediate results and recomputation. The algorithm is capable of tightly fitting within almost any user-set memory budget while finding an optimal execution policy minimizing the computational cost. Computational devices have limited memory capacity and maximizing a computational performance given a fixed memory budget is a practical use-case. We provide asymptotic computational upper bounds for various regimes. The algorithm is particularly effective for long sequences. For sequences of length 1000, our algorithm saves 95% of memory usage while using only one third more time per iteration than the standard BPTT.

    06/10/2016 ∙ by Audrūnas Gruslys, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • A Distributional Perspective on Reinforcement Learning

    In this paper we argue for the fundamental importance of the value distribution: the distribution of the random return received by a reinforcement learning agent. This is in contrast to the common approach to reinforcement learning which models the expectation of this return, or value. Although there is an established body of literature studying the value distribution, thus far it has always been used for a specific purpose such as implementing risk-aware behaviour. We begin with theoretical results in both the policy evaluation and control settings, exposing a significant distributional instability in the latter. We then use the distributional perspective to design a new algorithm which applies Bellman's equation to the learning of approximate value distributions. We evaluate our algorithm using the suite of games from the Arcade Learning Environment. We obtain both state-of-the-art results and anecdotal evidence demonstrating the importance of the value distribution in approximate reinforcement learning. Finally, we combine theoretical and empirical evidence to highlight the ways in which the value distribution impacts learning in the approximate setting.

    07/21/2017 ∙ by Marc G. Bellemare, et al. ∙ 0 share

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