Quoc V. Le

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Research Scientist at Google.

  • Searching for MobileNetV3

    We present the next generation of MobileNets based on a combination of complementary search techniques as well as a novel architecture design. MobileNetV3 is tuned to mobile phone CPUs through a combination of hardware aware network architecture search (NAS) complemented by the NetAdapt algorithm and then subsequently improved through novel architecture advances. This paper starts the exploration of how automated search algorithms and network design can work together to harness complementary approaches improving the overall state of the art. Through this process we create two new MobileNet models for release: MobileNetV3-Large and MobileNetV3-Small which are targeted for high and low resource use cases. These models are then adapted and applied to the tasks of object detection and semantic segmentation. For the task of semantic segmentation (or any dense pixel prediction), we propose a new efficient segmentation decoder Lite Reduced Atrous Spatial Pyramid Pooling (LR-ASPP). We achieve new state of the art results for mobile classification, detection and segmentation. MobileNetV3-Large is 3.2 classification while reducing latency by 15 MobileNetV2-Small is 4.6 to MobileNetV2. MobileNetV3-Large detection is 25 accuracy as MobileNetV2 on COCO detection. MobileNetV3-Large LR-ASPP is 30 faster than MobileNetV2 R-ASPP at similar accuracy for Cityscapes segmentation.

    05/06/2019 ∙ by Andrew Howard, et al. ∙ 53 share

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  • Attention Augmented Convolutional Networks

    Convolutional networks have been the paradigm of choice in many computer vision applications. The convolution operation however has a significant weakness in that it only operates on a local neighborhood, thus missing global information. Self-attention, on the other hand, has emerged as a recent advance to capture long range interactions, but has mostly been applied to sequence modeling and generative modeling tasks. In this paper, we consider the use of self-attention for discriminative visual tasks as an alternative to convolutions. We introduce a novel two-dimensional relative self-attention mechanism that proves competitive in replacing convolutions as a stand-alone computational primitive for image classification. We find in control experiments that the best results are obtained when combining both convolutions and self-attention. We therefore propose to augment convolutional operators with this self-attention mechanism by concatenating convolutional feature maps with a set of feature maps produced via self-attention. Extensive experiments show that Attention Augmentation leads to consistent improvements in image classification on ImageNet and object detection on COCO across many different models and scales, including ResNets and a state-of-the art mobile constrained network, while keeping the number of parameters similar. In particular, our method achieves a 1.3% top-1 accuracy improvement on ImageNet classification over a ResNet50 baseline and outperforms other attention mechanisms for images such as Squeeze-and-Excitation. It also achieves an improvement of 1.4 mAP in COCO Object Detection on top of a RetinaNet baseline.

    04/22/2019 ∙ by Irwan Bello, et al. ∙ 30 share

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  • Unsupervised Data Augmentation

    Despite its success, deep learning still needs large labeled datasets to succeed. Data augmentation has shown much promise in alleviating the need for more labeled data, but it so far has mostly been applied in supervised settings and achieved limited gains. In this work, we propose to apply data augmentation to unlabeled data in a semi-supervised learning setting. Our method, named Unsupervised Data Augmentation or UDA, encourages the model predictions to be consistent between an unlabeled example and an augmented unlabeled example. Unlike previous methods that use random noise such as Gaussian noise or dropout noise, UDA has a small twist in that it makes use of harder and more realistic noise generated by state-of-the-art data augmentation methods. This small twist leads to substantial improvements on six language tasks and three vision tasks even when the labeled set is extremely small. For example, on the IMDb text classification dataset, with only 20 labeled examples, UDA outperforms the state-of-the-art model trained on 25,000 labeled examples. On standard semi-supervised learning benchmarks, CIFAR-10 with 4,000 examples and SVHN with 1,000 examples, UDA outperforms all previous approaches and reduces more than 30% of the error rates of state-of-the-art methods: going from 7.66 5.27 that have a lot of labeled data. For example, on ImageNet, with 1.3M extra unlabeled data, UDA improves the top-1/top-5 accuracy from 78.28/94.36 79.04/94.45

    04/29/2019 ∙ by Qizhe Xie, et al. ∙ 18 share

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  • SpecAugment: A Simple Data Augmentation Method for Automatic Speech Recognition

    We present SpecAugment, a simple data augmentation method for speech recognition. SpecAugment is applied directly to the feature inputs of a neural network (i.e., filter bank coefficients). The augmentation policy consists of warping the features, masking blocks of frequency channels, and masking blocks of time steps. We apply SpecAugment on Listen, Attend and Spell networks for end-to-end speech recognition tasks. We achieve state-of-the-art performance on the LibriSpeech 960h and Swichboard 300h tasks, outperforming all prior work. On LibriSpeech, we achieve 6.8 model, and 5.8 the previous state-of-the-art hybrid system of 7.5 achieve 7.2 without the use of a language model, and 6.8 compares to the previous state-of-the-art hybrid system at 8.3

    04/18/2019 ∙ by Daniel S. Park, et al. ∙ 16 share

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  • DropBlock: A regularization method for convolutional networks

    Deep neural networks often work well when they are over-parameterized and trained with a massive amount of noise and regularization, such as weight decay and dropout. Although dropout is widely used as a regularization technique for fully connected layers, it is often less effective for convolutional layers. This lack of success of dropout for convolutional layers is perhaps due to the fact that activation units in convolutional layers are spatially correlated so information can still flow through convolutional networks despite dropout. Thus a structured form of dropout is needed to regularize convolutional networks. In this paper, we introduce DropBlock, a form of structured dropout, where units in a contiguous region of a feature map are dropped together. We found that applying DropbBlock in skip connections in addition to the convolution layers increases the accuracy. Also, gradually increasing number of dropped units during training leads to better accuracy and more robust to hyperparameter choices. Extensive experiments show that DropBlock works better than dropout in regularizing convolutional networks. On ImageNet classification, ResNet-50 architecture with DropBlock achieves 78.13% accuracy, which is more than 1.6% improvement on the baseline. On COCO detection, DropBlock improves Average Precision of RetinaNet from 36.8% to 38.4%.

    10/30/2018 ∙ by Golnaz Ghiasi, et al. ∙ 12 share

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  • Learning Data Augmentation Strategies for Object Detection

    Data augmentation is a critical component of training deep learning models. Although data augmentation has been shown to significantly improve image classification, its potential has not been thoroughly investigated for object detection. Given the additional cost for annotating images for object detection, data augmentation may be of even greater importance for this computer vision task. In this work, we study the impact of data augmentation on object detection. We first demonstrate that data augmentation operations borrowed from image classification may be helpful for training detection models, but the improvement is limited. Thus, we investigate how learned, specialized data augmentation policies improve generalization performance for detection models. Importantly, these augmentation policies only affect training and leave a trained model unchanged during evaluation. Experiments on the COCO dataset indicate that an optimized data augmentation policy improves detection accuracy by more than +2.3 mAP, and allow a single inference model to achieve a state-of-the-art accuracy of 50.7 mAP. Importantly, the best policy found on COCO may be transferred unchanged to other detection datasets and models to improve predictive accuracy. For example, the best augmentation policy identified with COCO improves a strong baseline on PASCAL-VOC by +2.7 mAP. Our results also reveal that a learned augmentation policy is superior to state-of-the-art architecture regularization methods for object detection, even when considering strong baselines. Code for training with the learned policy is available online at https://github.com/tensorflow/tpu/tree/master/models/official/detection

    06/26/2019 ∙ by Barret Zoph, et al. ∙ 4 share

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  • Transformer-XL: Attentive Language Models Beyond a Fixed-Length Context

    Transformer networks have a potential of learning longer-term dependency, but are limited by a fixed-length context in the setting of language modeling. As a solution, we propose a novel neural architecture, Transformer-XL, that enables Transformer to learn dependency beyond a fixed length without disrupting temporal coherence. Concretely, it consists of a segment-level recurrence mechanism and a novel positional encoding scheme. Our method not only enables capturing longer-term dependency, but also resolves the problem of context fragmentation. As a result, Transformer-XL learns dependency that is about 80% longer than RNNs and 450% longer than vanilla Transformers, achieves better performance on both short and long sequences, and is up to 1,800+ times faster than vanilla Transformer during evaluation. Additionally, we improve the state-of-the-art (SoTA) results of bpc/perplexity from 1.06 to 0.99 on enwiki8, from 1.13 to 1.08 on text8, from 20.5 to 18.3 on WikiText-103, from 23.7 to 21.8 on One Billion Word, and from 55.3 to 54.5 on Penn Treebank (without finetuning). Our code, pretrained models, and hyperparameters are available in both Tensorflow and PyTorch.

    01/09/2019 ∙ by Zihang Dai, et al. ∙ 2 share

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  • Selfie: Self-supervised Pretraining for Image Embedding

    We introduce a pretraining technique called Selfie, which stands for SELF-supervised Image Embedding. Selfie generalizes the concept of masked language modeling to continuous data, such as images. Given masked-out patches in an input image, our method learns to select the correct patch, among other "distractor" patches sampled from the same image, to fill in the masked location. This classification objective sidesteps the need for predicting exact pixel values of the target patches. The pretraining architecture includes a network of convolutional blocks to process patches followed by an attention pooling network to summarize the content of unmasked patches before predicting masked ones. During finetuning, we reuse the convolutional weights found by pretraining. We evaluate our method on three benchmarks (CIFAR-10, ImageNet 32 x 32, and ImageNet 224 x 224) with varying amounts of labeled data, from 5 100 improvements to ResNet-50 across all settings compared to the standard supervised training of the same network. Notably, on ImageNet 224 x 224 with 60 examples per class (5 from 35.6 pretraining method also improves ResNet-50 training stability, especially on low data regime, by significantly lowering the standard deviation of test accuracies across datasets.

    06/07/2019 ∙ by Trieu H. Trinh, et al. ∙ 2 share

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  • Building high-level features using large scale unsupervised learning

    We consider the problem of building high-level, class-specific feature detectors from only unlabeled data. For example, is it possible to learn a face detector using only unlabeled images? To answer this, we train a 9-layered locally connected sparse autoencoder with pooling and local contrast normalization on a large dataset of images (the model has 1 billion connections, the dataset has 10 million 200x200 pixel images downloaded from the Internet). We train this network using model parallelism and asynchronous SGD on a cluster with 1,000 machines (16,000 cores) for three days. Contrary to what appears to be a widely-held intuition, our experimental results reveal that it is possible to train a face detector without having to label images as containing a face or not. Control experiments show that this feature detector is robust not only to translation but also to scaling and out-of-plane rotation. We also find that the same network is sensitive to other high-level concepts such as cat faces and human bodies. Starting with these learned features, we trained our network to obtain 15.8 object categories from ImageNet, a leap of 70 previous state-of-the-art.

    12/29/2011 ∙ by Quoc V. Le, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Addressing the Rare Word Problem in Neural Machine Translation

    Neural Machine Translation (NMT) is a new approach to machine translation that has shown promising results that are comparable to traditional approaches. A significant weakness in conventional NMT systems is their inability to correctly translate very rare words: end-to-end NMTs tend to have relatively small vocabularies with a single unk symbol that represents every possible out-of-vocabulary (OOV) word. In this paper, we propose and implement an effective technique to address this problem. We train an NMT system on data that is augmented by the output of a word alignment algorithm, allowing the NMT system to emit, for each OOV word in the target sentence, the position of its corresponding word in the source sentence. This information is later utilized in a post-processing step that translates every OOV word using a dictionary. Our experiments on the WMT14 English to French translation task show that this method provides a substantial improvement of up to 2.8 BLEU points over an equivalent NMT system that does not use this technique. With 37.5 BLEU points, our NMT system is the first to surpass the best result achieved on a WMT14 contest task.

    10/30/2014 ∙ by Minh-Thang Luong, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Exploiting Similarities among Languages for Machine Translation

    Dictionaries and phrase tables are the basis of modern statistical machine translation systems. This paper develops a method that can automate the process of generating and extending dictionaries and phrase tables. Our method can translate missing word and phrase entries by learning language structures based on large monolingual data and mapping between languages from small bilingual data. It uses distributed representation of words and learns a linear mapping between vector spaces of languages. Despite its simplicity, our method is surprisingly effective: we can achieve almost 90 of words between English and Spanish. This method makes little assumption about the languages, so it can be used to extend and refine dictionaries and translation tables for any language pairs.

    09/17/2013 ∙ by Tomas Mikolov, et al. ∙ 0 share

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