Maxime Gasse

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  • Exact Combinatorial Optimization with Graph Convolutional Neural Networks

    Combinatorial optimization problems are typically tackled by the branch-and-bound paradigm. We propose a new graph convolutional neural network model for learning branch-and-bound variable selection policies, which leverages the natural variable-constraint bipartite graph representation of mixed-integer linear programs. We train our model via imitation learning from the strong branching expert rule, and demonstrate on a series of hard problems that our approach produces policies that improve upon state-of-the-art machine-learning methods for branching and generalize to instances significantly larger than seen during training. Moreover, we improve for the first time over expert-designed branching rules implemented in a state-of-the-art solver on large problems. Code for reproducing all the experiments can be found at https://github.com/ds4dm/learn2branch.

    06/04/2019 ∙ by Maxime Gasse, et al. ∙ 25 share

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  • A hybrid algorithm for Bayesian network structure learning with application to multi-label learning

    We present a novel hybrid algorithm for Bayesian network structure learning, called H2PC. It first reconstructs the skeleton of a Bayesian network and then performs a Bayesian-scoring greedy hill-climbing search to orient the edges. The algorithm is based on divide-and-conquer constraint-based subroutines to learn the local structure around a target variable. We conduct two series of experimental comparisons of H2PC against Max-Min Hill-Climbing (MMHC), which is currently the most powerful state-of-the-art algorithm for Bayesian network structure learning. First, we use eight well-known Bayesian network benchmarks with various data sizes to assess the quality of the learned structure returned by the algorithms. Our extensive experiments show that H2PC outperforms MMHC in terms of goodness of fit to new data and quality of the network structure with respect to the true dependence structure of the data. Second, we investigate H2PC's ability to solve the multi-label learning problem. We provide theoretical results to characterize and identify graphically the so-called minimal label powersets that appear as irreducible factors in the joint distribution under the faithfulness condition. The multi-label learning problem is then decomposed into a series of multi-class classification problems, where each multi-class variable encodes a label powerset. H2PC is shown to compare favorably to MMHC in terms of global classification accuracy over ten multi-label data sets covering different application domains. Overall, our experiments support the conclusions that local structural learning with H2PC in the form of local neighborhood induction is a theoretically well-motivated and empirically effective learning framework that is well suited to multi-label learning. The source code (in R) of H2PC as well as all data sets used for the empirical tests are publicly available.

    06/18/2015 ∙ by Maxime Gasse, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • An Experimental Comparison of Hybrid Algorithms for Bayesian Network Structure Learning

    We present a novel hybrid algorithm for Bayesian network structure learning, called Hybrid HPC (H2PC). It first reconstructs the skeleton of a Bayesian network and then performs a Bayesian-scoring greedy hill-climbing search to orient the edges. It is based on a subroutine called HPC, that combines ideas from incremental and divide-and-conquer constraint-based methods to learn the parents and children of a target variable. We conduct an experimental comparison of H2PC against Max-Min Hill-Climbing (MMHC), which is currently the most powerful state-of-the-art algorithm for Bayesian network structure learning, on several benchmarks with various data sizes. Our extensive experiments show that H2PC outperforms MMHC both in terms of goodness of fit to new data and in terms of the quality of the network structure itself, which is closer to the true dependence structure of the data. The source code (in R) of H2PC as well as all data sets used for the empirical tests are publicly available.

    05/19/2015 ∙ by Maxime Gasse, et al. ∙ 0 share

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