Matej Balog

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  • Fast Training of Sparse Graph Neural Networks on Dense Hardware

    Graph neural networks have become increasingly popular in recent years due to their ability to naturally encode relational input data and their ability to scale to large graphs by operating on a sparse representation of graph adjacency matrices. As we look to scale up these models using custom hardware, a natural assumption would be that we need hardware tailored to sparse operations and/or dynamic control flow. In this work, we question this assumption by scaling up sparse graph neural networks using a platform targeted at dense computation on fixed-size data. Drawing inspiration from optimization of numerical algorithms on sparse matrices, we develop techniques that enable training the sparse graph neural network model from Allamanis et al. [2018] in 13 minutes using a 512-core TPUv2 Pod, whereas the original training takes almost a day.

    06/27/2019 ∙ by Matej Balog, et al. ∙ 4 share

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  • Differentially Private Database Release via Kernel Mean Embeddings

    We lay theoretical foundations for new database release mechanisms that allow third-parties to construct consistent estimators of population statistics, while ensuring that the privacy of each individual contributing to the database is protected. The proposed framework rests on two main ideas. First, releasing (an estimate of) the kernel mean embedding of the data generating random variable instead of the database itself still allows third-parties to construct consistent estimators of a wide class of population statistics. Second, the algorithm can satisfy the definition of differential privacy by basing the released kernel mean embedding on entirely synthetic data points, while controlling accuracy through the metric available in a Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space. We describe two instantiations of the proposed framework, suitable under different scenarios, and prove theoretical results guaranteeing differential privacy of the resulting algorithms and the consistency of estimators constructed from their outputs.

    10/04/2017 ∙ by Matej Balog, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Lost Relatives of the Gumbel Trick

    The Gumbel trick is a method to sample from a discrete probability distribution, or to estimate its normalizing partition function. The method relies on repeatedly applying a random perturbation to the distribution in a particular way, each time solving for the most likely configuration. We derive an entire family of related methods, of which the Gumbel trick is one member, and show that the new methods have superior properties in several settings with minimal additional computational cost. In particular, for the Gumbel trick to yield computational benefits for discrete graphical models, Gumbel perturbations on all configurations are typically replaced with so-called low-rank perturbations. We show how a subfamily of our new methods adapts to this setting, proving new upper and lower bounds on the log partition function and deriving a family of sequential samplers for the Gibbs distribution. Finally, we balance the discussion by showing how the simpler analytical form of the Gumbel trick enables additional theoretical results.

    06/13/2017 ∙ by Matej Balog, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • The Mondrian Kernel

    We introduce the Mondrian kernel, a fast random feature approximation to the Laplace kernel. It is suitable for both batch and online learning, and admits a fast kernel-width-selection procedure as the random features can be re-used efficiently for all kernel widths. The features are constructed by sampling trees via a Mondrian process [Roy and Teh, 2009], and we highlight the connection to Mondrian forests [Lakshminarayanan et al., 2014], where trees are also sampled via a Mondrian process, but fit independently. This link provides a new insight into the relationship between kernel methods and random forests.

    06/16/2016 ∙ by Matej Balog, et al. ∙ 0 share

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