Koray Kavukcuoglu

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Director of Research at DeepMind

  • The StreetLearn Environment and Dataset

    Navigation is a rich and well-grounded problem domain that drives progress in many different areas of research: perception, planning, memory, exploration, and optimisation in particular. Historically these challenges have been separately considered and solutions built that rely on stationary datasets - for example, recorded trajectories through an environment. These datasets cannot be used for decision-making and reinforcement learning, however, and in general the perspective of navigation as an interactive learning task, where the actions and behaviours of a learning agent are learned simultaneously with the perception and planning, is relatively unsupported. Thus, existing navigation benchmarks generally rely on static datasets (Geiger et al., 2013; Kendall et al., 2015) or simulators (Beattie et al., 2016; Shah et al., 2018). To support and validate research in end-to-end navigation, we present StreetLearn: an interactive, first-person, partially-observed visual environment that uses Google Street View for its photographic content and broad coverage, and give performance baselines for a challenging goal-driven navigation task. The environment code, baseline agent code, and the dataset are available at http://streetlearn.cc

    03/04/2019 ∙ by Piotr Mirowski, et al. ∙ 8 share

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  • Human-level performance in first-person multiplayer games with population-based deep reinforcement learning

    Recent progress in artificial intelligence through reinforcement learning (RL) has shown great success on increasingly complex single-agent environments and two-player turn-based games. However, the real-world contains multiple agents, each learning and acting independently to cooperate and compete with other agents, and environments reflecting this degree of complexity remain an open challenge. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time that an agent can achieve human-level in a popular 3D multiplayer first-person video game, Quake III Arena Capture the Flag, using only pixels and game points as input. These results were achieved by a novel two-tier optimisation process in which a population of independent RL agents are trained concurrently from thousands of parallel matches with agents playing in teams together and against each other on randomly generated environments. Each agent in the population learns its own internal reward signal to complement the sparse delayed reward from winning, and selects actions using a novel temporally hierarchical representation that enables the agent to reason at multiple timescales. During game-play, these agents display human-like behaviours such as navigating, following, and defending based on a rich learned representation that is shown to encode high-level game knowledge. In an extensive tournament-style evaluation the trained agents exceeded the win-rate of strong human players both as teammates and opponents, and proved far stronger than existing state-of-the-art agents. These results demonstrate a significant jump in the capabilities of artificial agents, bringing us closer to the goal of human-level intelligence.

    07/03/2018 ∙ by Max Jaderberg, et al. ∙ 2 share

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  • WaveNet: A Generative Model for Raw Audio

    This paper introduces WaveNet, a deep neural network for generating raw audio waveforms. The model is fully probabilistic and autoregressive, with the predictive distribution for each audio sample conditioned on all previous ones; nonetheless we show that it can be efficiently trained on data with tens of thousands of samples per second of audio. When applied to text-to-speech, it yields state-of-the-art performance, with human listeners rating it as significantly more natural sounding than the best parametric and concatenative systems for both English and Mandarin. A single WaveNet can capture the characteristics of many different speakers with equal fidelity, and can switch between them by conditioning on the speaker identity. When trained to model music, we find that it generates novel and often highly realistic musical fragments. We also show that it can be employed as a discriminative model, returning promising results for phoneme recognition.

    09/12/2016 ∙ by Aaron van den Oord, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Playing Atari with Deep Reinforcement Learning

    We present the first deep learning model to successfully learn control policies directly from high-dimensional sensory input using reinforcement learning. The model is a convolutional neural network, trained with a variant of Q-learning, whose input is raw pixels and whose output is a value function estimating future rewards. We apply our method to seven Atari 2600 games from the Arcade Learning Environment, with no adjustment of the architecture or learning algorithm. We find that it outperforms all previous approaches on six of the games and surpasses a human expert on three of them.

    12/19/2013 ∙ by Volodymyr Mnih, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Asynchronous Methods for Deep Reinforcement Learning

    We propose a conceptually simple and lightweight framework for deep reinforcement learning that uses asynchronous gradient descent for optimization of deep neural network controllers. We present asynchronous variants of four standard reinforcement learning algorithms and show that parallel actor-learners have a stabilizing effect on training allowing all four methods to successfully train neural network controllers. The best performing method, an asynchronous variant of actor-critic, surpasses the current state-of-the-art on the Atari domain while training for half the time on a single multi-core CPU instead of a GPU. Furthermore, we show that asynchronous actor-critic succeeds on a wide variety of continuous motor control problems as well as on a new task of navigating random 3D mazes using a visual input.

    02/04/2016 ∙ by Volodymyr Mnih, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Decoupled Neural Interfaces using Synthetic Gradients

    Training directed neural networks typically requires forward-propagating data through a computation graph, followed by backpropagating error signal, to produce weight updates. All layers, or more generally, modules, of the network are therefore locked, in the sense that they must wait for the remainder of the network to execute forwards and propagate error backwards before they can be updated. In this work we break this constraint by decoupling modules by introducing a model of the future computation of the network graph. These models predict what the result of the modelled subgraph will produce using only local information. In particular we focus on modelling error gradients: by using the modelled synthetic gradient in place of true backpropagated error gradients we decouple subgraphs, and can update them independently and asynchronously i.e. we realise decoupled neural interfaces. We show results for feed-forward models, where every layer is trained asynchronously, recurrent neural networks (RNNs) where predicting one's future gradient extends the time over which the RNN can effectively model, and also a hierarchical RNN system with ticking at different timescales. Finally, we demonstrate that in addition to predicting gradients, the same framework can be used to predict inputs, resulting in models which are decoupled in both the forward and backwards pass -- amounting to independent networks which co-learn such that they can be composed into a single functioning corporation.

    08/18/2016 ∙ by Max Jaderberg, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Parallel WaveNet: Fast High-Fidelity Speech Synthesis

    The recently-developed WaveNet architecture is the current state of the art in realistic speech synthesis, consistently rated as more natural sounding for many different languages than any previous system. However, because WaveNet relies on sequential generation of one audio sample at a time, it is poorly suited to today's massively parallel computers, and therefore hard to deploy in a real-time production setting. This paper introduces Probability Density Distillation, a new method for training a parallel feed-forward network from a trained WaveNet with no significant difference in quality. The resulting system is capable of generating high-fidelity speech samples at more than 20 times faster than real-time, and is deployed online by Google Assistant, including serving multiple English and Japanese voices.

    11/28/2017 ∙ by Aaron van den Oord, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Automated Curriculum Learning for Neural Networks

    We introduce a method for automatically selecting the path, or syllabus, that a neural network follows through a curriculum so as to maximise learning efficiency. A measure of the amount that the network learns from each data sample is provided as a reward signal to a nonstationary multi-armed bandit algorithm, which then determines a stochastic syllabus. We consider a range of signals derived from two distinct indicators of learning progress: rate of increase in prediction accuracy, and rate of increase in network complexity. Experimental results for LSTM networks on three curricula demonstrate that our approach can significantly accelerate learning, in some cases halving the time required to attain a satisfactory performance level.

    04/10/2017 ∙ by Alex Graves, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Understanding Synthetic Gradients and Decoupled Neural Interfaces

    When training neural networks, the use of Synthetic Gradients (SG) allows layers or modules to be trained without update locking - without waiting for a true error gradient to be backpropagated - resulting in Decoupled Neural Interfaces (DNIs). This unlocked ability of being able to update parts of a neural network asynchronously and with only local information was demonstrated to work empirically in Jaderberg et al (2016). However, there has been very little demonstration of what changes DNIs and SGs impose from a functional, representational, and learning dynamics point of view. In this paper, we study DNIs through the use of synthetic gradients on feed-forward networks to better understand their behaviour and elucidate their effect on optimisation. We show that the incorporation of SGs does not affect the representational strength of the learning system for a neural network, and prove the convergence of the learning system for linear and deep linear models. On practical problems we investigate the mechanism by which synthetic gradient estimators approximate the true loss, and, surprisingly, how that leads to drastically different layer-wise representations. Finally, we also expose the relationship of using synthetic gradients to other error approximation techniques and find a unifying language for discussion and comparison.

    03/01/2017 ∙ by Wojciech Marian Czarnecki, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Reinforcement Learning with Unsupervised Auxiliary Tasks

    Deep reinforcement learning agents have achieved state-of-the-art results by directly maximising cumulative reward. However, environments contain a much wider variety of possible training signals. In this paper, we introduce an agent that also maximises many other pseudo-reward functions simultaneously by reinforcement learning. All of these tasks share a common representation that, like unsupervised learning, continues to develop in the absence of extrinsic rewards. We also introduce a novel mechanism for focusing this representation upon extrinsic rewards, so that learning can rapidly adapt to the most relevant aspects of the actual task. Our agent significantly outperforms the previous state-of-the-art on Atari, averaging 880% expert human performance, and a challenging suite of first-person, three-dimensional Labyrinth tasks leading to a mean speedup in learning of 10× and averaging 87% expert human performance on Labyrinth.

    11/16/2016 ∙ by Max Jaderberg, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Massively Parallel Methods for Deep Reinforcement Learning

    We present the first massively distributed architecture for deep reinforcement learning. This architecture uses four main components: parallel actors that generate new behaviour; parallel learners that are trained from stored experience; a distributed neural network to represent the value function or behaviour policy; and a distributed store of experience. We used our architecture to implement the Deep Q-Network algorithm (DQN). Our distributed algorithm was applied to 49 games from Atari 2600 games from the Arcade Learning Environment, using identical hyperparameters. Our performance surpassed non-distributed DQN in 41 of the 49 games and also reduced the wall-time required to achieve these results by an order of magnitude on most games.

    07/15/2015 ∙ by Arun Nair, et al. ∙ 0 share

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