Dustin Tran

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Research Scientist at Google

  • Bayesian Layers: A Module for Neural Network Uncertainty

    We describe Bayesian Layers, a module designed for fast experimentation with neural network uncertainty. It extends neural network libraries with layers capturing uncertainty over weights (Bayesian neural nets), pre-activation units (dropout), activations ("stochastic output layers"), and the function itself (Gaussian processes). With reversible layers, one can also propagate uncertainty from input to output such as for flow-based distributions and constant-memory backpropagation. Bayesian Layers are a drop-in replacement for other layers, maintaining core features that one typically desires for experimentation. As demonstration, we fit a 10-billion parameter "Bayesian Transformer" on 512 TPUv2 cores, which replaces attention layers with their Bayesian counterpart.

    12/10/2018 ∙ by Dustin Tran, et al. ∙ 14 share

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  • Measuring Calibration in Deep Learning

    The reliability of a machine learning model's confidence in its predictions is critical for highrisk applications. Calibration-the idea that a model's predicted probabilities of outcomes reflect true probabilities of those outcomes-formalizes this notion. While analyzing the calibration of deep neural networks, we've identified core problems with the way calibration is currently measured. We design the Thresholded Adaptive Calibration Error (TACE) metric to resolve these pathologies and show that it outperforms other metrics, especially in settings where predictions beyond the maximum prediction that is chosen as the output class matter. There are many cases where what a practitioner cares about is the calibration of a specific prediction, and so we introduce a dynamic programming based Prediction Specific Calibration Error (PSCE) that smoothly considers the calibration of nearby predictions to give an estimate of the calibration error of a specific prediction.

    04/02/2019 ∙ by Jeremy Nixon, et al. ∙ 10 share

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  • Reliable Uncertainty Estimates in Deep Neural Networks using Noise Contrastive Priors

    Obtaining reliable uncertainty estimates of neural network predictions is a long standing challenge. Bayesian neural networks have been proposed as a solution, but it remains open how to specify the prior. In particular, the common practice of a standard normal prior in weight space imposes only weak regularities, causing the function posterior to possibly generalize in unforeseen ways on out-of-distribution inputs. We propose noise contrastive priors (NCPs). The key idea is to train the model to output high uncertainty for data points outside of the training distribution. NCPs do so using an input prior, which adds noise to the inputs of the current mini batch, and an output prior, which is a wide distribution given these inputs. NCPs are compatible with any model that represents predictive uncertainty, are easy to scale, and yield reliable uncertainty estimates throughout training. Empirically, we show that NCPs offer clear improvements as an addition to existing baselines. We demonstrate the scalability on the flight delays data set, where we significantly improve upon previously published results.

    07/24/2018 ∙ by Danijar Hafner, et al. ∙ 8 share

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  • Mesh-TensorFlow: Deep Learning for Supercomputers

    Batch-splitting (data-parallelism) is the dominant distributed Deep Neural Network (DNN) training strategy, due to its universal applicability and its amenability to Single-Program-Multiple-Data (SPMD) programming. However, batch-splitting suffers from problems including the inability to train very large models (due to memory constraints), high latency, and inefficiency at small batch sizes. All of these can be solved by more general distribution strategies (model-parallelism). Unfortunately, efficient model-parallel algorithms tend to be complicated to discover, describe, and to implement, particularly on large clusters. We introduce Mesh-TensorFlow, a language for specifying a general class of distributed tensor computations. Where data-parallelism can be viewed as splitting tensors and operations along the "batch" dimension, in Mesh-TensorFlow, the user can specify any tensor-dimensions to be split across any dimensions of a multi-dimensional mesh of processors. A Mesh-TensorFlow graph compiles into a SPMD program consisting of parallel operations coupled with collective communication primitives such as Allreduce. We use Mesh-TensorFlow to implement an efficient data-parallel, model-parallel version of the Transformer sequence-to-sequence model. Using TPU meshes of up to 512 cores, we train Transformer models with up to 5 billion parameters, surpassing state of the art results on WMT'14 English-to-French translation task and the one-billion-word language modeling benchmark. Mesh-Tensorflow is available at https://github.com/tensorflow/mesh .

    11/05/2018 ∙ by Noam Shazeer, et al. ∙ 8 share

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  • Simple, Distributed, and Accelerated Probabilistic Programming

    We describe a simple, low-level approach for embedding probabilistic programming in a deep learning ecosystem. In particular, we distill probabilistic programming down to a single abstraction---the random variable. Our lightweight implementation in TensorFlow enables numerous applications: a model-parallel variational auto-encoder (VAE) with 2nd-generation tensor processing units (TPUv2s); a data-parallel autoregressive model (Image Transformer) with TPUv2s; and multi-GPU No-U-Turn Sampler (NUTS). For both a state-of-the-art VAE on 64x64 ImageNet and Image Transformer on 256x256 CelebA-HQ, our approach achieves an optimal linear speedup from 1 to 256 TPUv2 chips. With NUTS, we see a 100x speedup on GPUs over Stan and 37x over PyMC3.

    11/05/2018 ∙ by Dustin Tran, et al. ∙ 6 share

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  • Discrete Flows: Invertible Generative Models of Discrete Data

    While normalizing flows have led to significant advances in modeling high-dimensional continuous distributions, their applicability to discrete distributions remains unknown. In this paper, we show that flows can in fact be extended to discrete events---and under a simple change-of-variables formula not requiring log-determinant-Jacobian computations. Discrete flows have numerous applications. We consider two flow architectures: discrete autoregressive flows that enable bidirectionality, allowing, for example, tokens in text to depend on both left-to-right and right-to-left contexts in an exact language model; and discrete bipartite flows that enable efficient non-autoregressive generation as in RealNVP. Empirically, we find that discrete autoregressive flows outperform autoregressive baselines on synthetic discrete distributions, an addition task, and Potts models; and bipartite flows can obtain competitive performance with autoregressive baselines on character-level language modeling for Penn Tree Bank and text8.

    05/24/2019 ∙ by Dustin Tran, et al. ∙ 6 share

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  • Autoconj: Recognizing and Exploiting Conjugacy Without a Domain-Specific Language

    Deriving conditional and marginal distributions using conjugacy relationships can be time consuming and error prone. In this paper, we propose a strategy for automating such derivations. Unlike previous systems which focus on relationships between pairs of random variables, our system (which we call Autoconj) operates directly on Python functions that compute log-joint distribution functions. Autoconj provides support for conjugacy-exploiting algorithms in any Python embedded PPL. This paves the way for accelerating development of novel inference algorithms and structure-exploiting modeling strategies.

    11/29/2018 ∙ by Matthew D. Hoffman, et al. ∙ 6 share

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  • Analyzing the Role of Model Uncertainty for Electronic Health Records

    In medicine, both ethical and monetary costs of incorrect predictions can be significant, and the complexity of the problems often necessitates increasingly complex models. Recent work has shown that changing just the random seed is enough for otherwise well-tuned deep neural networks to vary in their individual predicted probabilities. In light of this, we investigate the role of model uncertainty methods in the medical domain. Using RNN ensembles and various Bayesian RNNs, we show that population-level metrics, such as AUC-PR, AUC-ROC, log-likelihood, and calibration error, do not capture model uncertainty. Meanwhile, the presence of significant variability in patient-specific predictions and optimal decisions motivates the need for capturing model uncertainty. Understanding the uncertainty for individual patients is an area with clear clinical impact, such as determining when a model decision is likely to be brittle. We further show that RNNs with only Bayesian embeddings can be a more efficient way to capture model uncertainty compared to ensembles, and we analyze how model uncertainty is impacted across individual input features and patient subgroups.

    06/10/2019 ∙ by Michael W. Dusenberry, et al. ∙ 3 share

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  • Hierarchical Implicit Models and Likelihood-Free Variational Inference

    Implicit probabilistic models are a flexible class of models defined by a simulation process for data. They form the basis for theories which encompass our understanding of the physical world. Despite this fundamental nature, the use of implicit models remains limited due to challenges in specifying complex latent structure in them, and in performing inferences in such models with large data sets. In this paper, we first introduce hierarchical implicit models (HIMs). HIMs combine the idea of implicit densities with hierarchical Bayesian modeling, thereby defining models via simulators of data with rich hidden structure. Next, we develop likelihood-free variational inference (LFVI), a scalable variational inference algorithm for HIMs. Key to LFVI is specifying a variational family that is also implicit. This matches the model's flexibility and allows for accurate approximation of the posterior. We demonstrate diverse applications: a large-scale physical simulator for predator-prey populations in ecology; a Bayesian generative adversarial network for discrete data; and a deep implicit model for text generation.

    02/28/2017 ∙ by Dustin Tran, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Deep Probabilistic Programming

    We propose Edward, a Turing-complete probabilistic programming language. Edward defines two compositional representations---random variables and inference. By treating inference as a first class citizen, on a par with modeling, we show that probabilistic programming can be as flexible and computationally efficient as traditional deep learning. For flexibility, Edward makes it easy to fit the same model using a variety of composable inference methods, ranging from point estimation to variational inference to MCMC. In addition, Edward can reuse the modeling representation as part of inference, facilitating the design of rich variational models and generative adversarial networks. For efficiency, Edward is integrated into TensorFlow, providing significant speedups over existing probabilistic systems. For example, we show on a benchmark logistic regression task that Edward is at least 35x faster than Stan and 6x faster than PyMC3. Further, Edward incurs no runtime overhead: it is as fast as handwritten TensorFlow.

    01/13/2017 ∙ by Dustin Tran, et al. ∙ 0 share

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  • Variational Inference via χ-Upper Bound Minimization

    Variational inference (VI) is widely used as an efficient alternative to Markov chain Monte Carlo. It posits a family of approximating distributions q and finds the closest member to the exact posterior p. Closeness is usually measured via a divergence D(q || p) from q to p. While successful, this approach also has problems. Notably, it typically leads to underestimation of the posterior variance. In this paper we propose CHIVI, a black-box variational inference algorithm that minimizes D_χ(p || q), the χ-divergence from p to q. CHIVI minimizes an upper bound of the model evidence, which we term the χ upper bound (CUBO). Minimizing the CUBO leads to improved posterior uncertainty, and it can also be used with the classical VI lower bound (ELBO) to provide a sandwich estimate of the model evidence. We study CHIVI on three models: probit regression, Gaussian process classification, and a Cox process model of basketball plays. When compared to expectation propagation and classical VI, CHIVI produces better error rates and more accurate estimates of posterior variance.

    11/01/2016 ∙ by Adji B. Dieng, et al. ∙ 0 share

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